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Postdoctoral Fellows in Law and Society

The Newcomb College Institute of Tulane University seeks two or more postdoctoral fellows in law and society. We seek applicants whose research takes an intersectional approach to law and society, reflecting how gender, race, class, disability, sexuality, ethnicity, community, immigration status, and national identities shape law and, in turn, how law shapes those identities. We will consider applicants beginning in the Fall of 2017 or Spring of 2018 for a single semester, a calendar year, or the 2017-2018 academic year for up to two years of support per person. We prefer a two-year appointment, but are open to shorter terms.

The fellows will receive mentoring from senior faculty, participate in our interdisciplinary community focused on intersectionality, and mentor undergraduate student research assistants. We expect fellow to participate in brown bag seminars, receptions, and other programming, mentor one or more undergraduate research assistants, and help to organize a workshop in the fall of the second year of the fellowship. We especially invite applicants whose research and teaching interests focus on/contribute to increased understanding of law, intersectionality, and identity in New Orleans, Louisiana, and/or the Gulf Coast South, as well as those with a demonstrated commitment to building interdisciplinary community.


Applicants should apply via Interfolio (https://apply.interfolio.com/42005) and should include a:

  • Cover letter explaining their research interests, length of time they would want to be in residence, when they would want to start, and identifying the faculty member or member they would work most closely with
  • C.V.
  • List of three references

Questions may be addressed to Laura Wolford, Assistant Director of the Newcomb College Institute at lwolford@tulane.edu. Screening will begin June 15, 2017 and continue until the positions are filled.

Tulane University is an equal employment opportunity/affirmative action/persons with disabilities/veterans employer committed to excellence through diversity. Tulane will not discriminate against individuals with disabilities or veterans. All eligible candidates are encouraged to apply.


Qualifications:

PhD in Political Science, History, American Studies, Sociology, Women and/or Gender Studies, Psychology, or other closely related fields.  PhD must be in hand when appointment starts. 

Demonstrated research interests with an intersectional approach to law and society, reflecting how gender, race, class, disability, sexuality, ethnicity, community, immigration status, and national identities shape law and in turn, how law shapes those identities. 

Preference to applicants whose research and teaching interests focus on/contribute to increased understanding of law, intersectionality and identity in New Orleans, Louisiana, and/or the Gulf Coast South, as well as those with a demonstrated commitment to building an interdisciplinary community.  


About Newcomb College Institute

The legacy of women-focused undergraduate education continues at Tulane University through the Newcomb College Institute. Under the leadership of Executive Director Sally Kenney, NCI consistently provides vibrant, intellectually rigorous programming on women's issues for the university community, while funding faculty and student research grants.

Our mission is to:

  • Cultivate lifelong leadership among undergraduate women at Tulane University
  • Empower women by integrating teaching, research, and community engagement at Tulane University
  • Preserve, document, produce, and disseminate knowledge about women
  • Honor the memory of H. Sophie Newcomb and carry forward the work of Newcomb College by providing a woman-centered experience in a co-ed institution

Related faculty at Tulane:

We propose to recruit scholars to work closely on a project with one of several faculty members at Tulane. Given this interdisciplinary group of scholars, a postdoctoral fellow could work on projects related to judging, sexual assault on campus, women in prison, the history of slavery in the Gulf Coast, the psychology of discrimination, law and personhood, women and development, activism, human rights, or another closely related project. Sally Kenney and Laura Rosanne Adderley will serve as lead mentors, with the support of a wider community of faculty on campus. 

Sally J. Kenney, Professor of Political Science and Executive Director of the Newcomb College Institute, conducts research on discrimination against women and minority men in the legal profession, focusing particularly on judges. She studies race and gender in judicial selection; state judicial elections; backlash against non-traditional judges and challenges to their objectivity; sexual assault on campus; women's leadership; women and girls in Kenya, and women's incarceration in Louisiana.  

Laura Rosanne Adderley, Associate Professor of History and director of the Africana Studies program, has projects on the history of the African Diaspora; the Atlantic Slave Trade; black enslavement in the Americas; Caribbean history; and African-American history.  

 

Laurie O'Brien is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology. Trained in the areas of prejudice and stigma, her research explores how lay people perceive (and fail to perceive) prejudice. 

 

Saru Matambanadzo, Associate Professor of Law, has published on legal sex for transgendered persons, philosophy of legal education, legal personhood, and feminist legal theory.

 
Michael Cunningham is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and the undergraduate program in Africana Studies. As a developed psychologist, his research examines the intersections of race, gender, and SES in African American adolescents within an ecological context. 

Stacy Overstreet
focuses broadly on children at risk for maladjustment due to the presence of chronic stressors in their lives. In her current research, Professor Overstreet utilizes an ecological-transactional model to understand the effects of community violence exposure and other traumatic experiences on the psychosocial and academic functioning of children and to identify protective factors that buffer children from the negative effects of such experiences.

 

Lisa Molix, Associate Professor of Psychology, focuses on intergroup relations, health and well-being among marginalized populations, and the intersections among these areas.

Tania Tetlow is the Felder-Fayard Early Career Associate Professor of Law. A former Assistant US Attorney with extensive experience with the Violence Against Women Act, she is the former Director of the Tulane Domestic Violence Clinic. Her research focuses on jury discrimination against the victims of crime by race and gender, making particular connections between the two. Just as juries historically acquitted those who committed violence against blacks (like Emmett Till) who broke the racial rules, so juries continue to put the victims of gender-based violence on trial for their obedience to gender rules.  She argues that the "discriminatory acquittal" violates the Constitution, and works on procedural tools to prevent it.

 

Nancy Maveety is a Professor and chair of the Department of Political Science and the former Director of the Gender and Sexuality Studies Program. Her research focuses on judicial process and decision making and US constitutional law and comparative judicial politics.

Gretchen Clum

 

Heather Storer 

 

Catherine Burnette

 

Izabela Steflja 

 

Geoff Dancy 

 

Nghana Lewis

 

Zachary Lazar

Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 504-865-5000 website@tulane.edu