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Former Gulf Claims head Kenneth Feinberg to speak at Tulane

April 1, 2015

Barri Bronston
Phone: 504-314-7444
bbronst@tulane.edu

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Kenneth Feinberg

Kenneth Feinberg, a renowned attorney who has overseen the claims process for such high-profile disasters as the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the BP oil spill, will deliver a public lecture April 7 at Tulane Law School.

Feinberg, who served as administrator of the Gulf Coast Claims Facility from 2010 to 2012, will talk about his extensive experience in assessing who should get paid what and how the law can respond to calamity.

The title of his lecture, which is free and open to the public, is “Unconventional Responses to Unique Catastrophes: Tailoring the Law to Meet the Challenges.” It is set for 5 p.m. in the Wendell H. Gauthier Appellate Moot Court Room 110 at Weinmann Hall, 6329 Freret St. A reception will follow.

Esquire magazine has called Feinberg “the nation’s leading expert on picking up the pieces.” In addition to the 9/11 terrorist attacks, he has overseen the claims process for the Boston Marathon bombings and the Virginia Tech and Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting rampages.

The Obama Administration and BP jointly designated Feinberg as administrator of the Gulf Coast Claims Facility to determine payment for the families of oil-rig workers who were killed in the Deepwater Horizon explosion and the Gulf Coast residents whose livelihoods were devastated by the damage.

Even before he became an in-demand compensation fund administrator, Feinberg was a pre-eminent mediator. Among other cases, he helped negotiate a $180 million settlement in a class-action suit brought by Vietnam veterans injured by exposure to Agent Orange.

After Congress created the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund, the first time federal money was used to directly pay the injured and relatives of mass disaster, Feinberg distributed about $7 billion. He wrote about the experience in the 2005 book What Is Life Worth?

Feinberg is currently reviewing claims stemming from crashes linked to defective GM ignition switches.

 

Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 504-865-5000 website@tulane.edu