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Co-discoverer of HIV to speak at Tulane

March 5, 2015

Arthur Nead
Phone: 504-247-1443
anead@tulane.edu

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Dr. Robert Gallo, co-discoverer of HIV, speaks on infectious disease research at Tulane. (Photo: the Institute of Human Virology)

Dr. Robert Gallo, most widely known as a co-discoverer of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the cause of AIDS, will speak on “Journey with Blood Cells and Viruses” at Freeman Auditorium in Woldenberg Art Center at 7 p.m., March 12. 

The talk is the public keynote address for a three-day Presidential Symposium entitled “Translational Research in Infectious Diseases: From Microbes to Man,” to be held at Tulane March 11-13. The symposium, sponsored by the President’s Office, celebrates contributions to infectious disease research by faculty in the School of Medicine and School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, and is a part of this year’s celebration of the 50th anniversary of the establishment of the Tulane National Primate Research Center in Covington, Louisiana.

In addition to the keynote address the symposium will feature scientific presentations throughout the three days, focusing on different areas of biomedical research into infectious.  

“The presentations will cover the entire spectrum of biomedical research from identification of a disease, determining the pathogenesis of the disease, identifying diagnostic, therapeutic or vaccine targets, formulation of a therapeutic or vaccine, testing in small animals and nonhuman primates and testing and approval for use in humans,” says Andrew A. Lackner, professor of microbiology, immunology and pathology; and director and chief academic officer, Tulane National Primate Research Center.

Gallo is director of the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. He is also currently co-founder and scientific director of the Global Virus Network. Previously (for 30 years) he was at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, MD. A reception in Woodward Way follows the keynote speech, which is free and open to the public. 

Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 504-865-5000 website@tulane.edu