Katrina at 10 years Conference logo

August 27, 2015, New Orleans, Louisiana

Conference Sessions Details

Resilience in Survivors of Katrina Study (RISK):
Lead: Tom Wooten, Harvard University

RISK is a longitudinal study of low-income parents who lived in New Orleans at the time of Hurricane Katrina. Starting in 2003, 1,019 low-income parents from New Orleans enrolled in a study designed to increase educational attainment among community college students. The study measured participants’ economic status, social ties, and mental and physical health. Since the hurricane, two follow-up surveys and two sets of in-depth qualitative interviews have been conducted with study participants, regardless of where they moved after the hurricane at one year and five years post disaster. Early research based on these data has provided new insights into the short- and medium-term consequences of natural disasters for mental health and the role of economic and social factors in promoting resilience and recovery for this uniquely-affected population. The proposed Program includes a new wave of data collection for RISK that will help to discern long term trajectories of and differentials in recovery for this cohort as well as for the other primary data collection projects. Learn more at www.riskproject.org/.


Gulf Coast Children and Family Health (GCAFH) Study
Lead: David Abramson, PhD

GCAFH is a longitudinal study of families that had been displaced or greatly impacted by Hurricane Katrina. Starting in 2006, a random sample of 1,079 households in Louisiana and Mississippi was drawn from FEMA lists of congregate settings and census blocks listed on a FEMA damage assessment database as having suffered moderate, comprehensive or catastrophic damage. The study included a wide range of outcome measures of recovery as well as potential influences on their trajectories of recovery, such as economic status and social ties. Three follow-up rounds of data collection were conducted since the baseline interview, at 23, 36, and 54 months after the hurricane. Earlier research based on these data has expanded what we know about how severely-affected households recover in the short-and medium term post-disaster; and has provided the basic tools for developing a generalizable model of post-disaster recovery that will be expanded and applied to our other two cohorts. The proposed Program includes a new wave of data collection for GCAFH that will help to measure and understand long term trajectories of and differentials in recovery for this cohort as well as for the Program’s other two cohorts. Learn more at www.gcafh.org.


The Displaced New Orleans Residents Survey (DNORS)
Lead: Narayan Sastry, PhD

This component analyzes already-collected data from the Displaced New Orleans Residents Study (DNORS), which employs a representative sample of New Orleans’ pre-Katrina population. The aims of this study are to characterize return migration propensities and displacement locations among individuals and families displaced from New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina; describe the prevalence of psychological distress and disparities by factors such as race; and assess the causal effects of residential displacement and relocation on mental health outcomes. Learn more at: www.rand.org/labor/projects/dnors.html. 


Katrina Impacts on Vietnamese Americans in New Orleans (KATIVA NOLA)
Leads: Mai, Do, DrPH and Mark VanLandingham, PhD

KATIVA NOLA is a longitudinal study of first-generation Vietnamese-American families who were living in New Orleans at the time of Hurricane Katrina. Just weeks before Hurricane Katrina struck in the late summer of 2005, a representative sample of all Vietnamese families living in New Orleans was drawn from a comprehensive and recently-updated population register of Vietnamese families. The study included a wide range of physical and mental health outcomes, measures of socioeconomic status, social ties, acculturation, and past-histories of the families. Three post-Katrina follow up waves were conducted at 1 year, 2-years, and 5 years post-Katrina. Earlier research based on these data has documented the trajectory of recovery within this immigrant enclave in the short-and medium term, including differentials in recovery. The proposed Program includes a new wave of data collection for KATIVA NOLA that will help to discern long term trajectories of and differentials in recovery for this cohort as well as for the other two primary data collection projects. Learn more at:  sph.tulane.edu/publichealth/mhosa/kativanola.cfm


Change in the Demographics of New Orleans (NEW NOLA)
Lead: Elizabeth Fussell, PhD

The aim of this project is to examine the role of in- and out-migration in the unequal repopulation of New Orleans by using the American Community Survey (ACS) for all years between 2005 and 2015.

Questions? Please contact cbr@tulane.edu