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Research Spotlight

The latest research news from the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.


Faculty Sponsored Research Project Wins the GNOSEF Grand Award  may 2018

Faculty Sponsored Research Project Wins the GNOSEF Grand AwardUnder the direction of Dr. Katie Russell, Lusher Charter School junior Amaris Lewis completed a project which landed her the Grand Award at the Greater New Orleans Science and Engineering Fair. Her project, titled "Evaluating the Potential of CD264 as an Effective Biomarker for Cellular Aging in Mesenchymal Stem Cells" was conducted in teh lab of Dr. Kim O'Connor and funded by the National Science Foundation.


Tulane Lab Looks to Create 'Dream Reaction' October 10, 2017

Daniel Shantz In Lab Tulane University’s Shantz Lab has received a two-year grant of $110,000 from the American Chemical Society’s (ACS) Petroleum Research Fund to find a solution to one of the chemical industry's most demanding transformations, the direct conversion of benzene to phenol.

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Tulane Receives Grant to Reduce Auto Emissions September 19, 2017

Shantz Lab Grant EmissionsMembers of Tulane University’s Shantz Lab will work with industrial scientists to assist in the development of next-generation materials designed to reduce harmful automotive emissions. The three-year-old lab and its group of students have received a grant and equipment resources from SACHEM, Inc., a chemical science company.

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Microbial Measures spring 2017

Sandoval LabThe Sandoval lab research team is working to develop microbes that will help with therapeutics, sustainable fuel and chemical productions

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Professor receives grant to improve stem cell survival  fall 2016

Kim O'Connor, a professor in Tulane University's Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, received a three year $599,638 grant from the National Science Foundation to study ways to improve the survival of mesenchymal stem cells once they are implanted in patients. Mesenchymal stem cells can change into different types of cells including bone, cartilage or muscle.

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