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Colloquia


Please see our
Colloquia
page for information on our regularly scheduled seminar series. The information below features special events scheduled in addition to our continuing seminar series.  

 

Spring 2018 - Special Eventstop ⇑

Feb 1

Public Panel on Artificial Intelligence and Society at Tulane

"What will Artificial Intelligence Bring? Discussing the Advent and Consequences of Superhuman Intelligence"


Date:
Thursday, February 1, 2018
Time:
6:00 p.m.
Location:
Freeman Auditorium, Woldenberg Art Center

This panel is open to the public. Reception will follow.

Panelists:

Paula Boddington, Philosopher, Oxford University
Jason Furman, Economist, Harvard University
Peter Stone, Computer Scientist, UT Austin
Wendell Wallach, Ethicist, The Hastings Center and Yale University's Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics

Moderator: K. Brent Venable, Computer Scientist, Tulane University and IHMC

Sponsors: AAAI/ACM Conference on AI, Ethics and Society (February 1-3, 2018, New Orleans)
Tulane University Office of Academic Affairs and Provost
Tulane University Carol Lavin Bernick Fund
Tulane University D.W. Mitchell Fund.


As AI is becoming more pervasive in our life, its impact on society is more significant and concerns and issues are raised regarding aspects such as value alignment, data handling and bias, regulations, and workforce displacement. Recognizing the importance of providing scientifically sound and reliable information on this topic, the AAAI/ACM Conference on Artificial Intelligence, Ethics and Society will open its program with a panel open to the public. World class researchers from different disciplines and best selling authors will elaborate on the impact of AI on modern society and will answer questions from the public. 

Paula Boddington has been working in the Department of Computer Science at Oxford University on a project investigating the possibilities of developing codes of ethics for artificial intelligence, where she has been funded by the Future of Life Institute. She is a philosopher by background, and has worked extensively on questions in applied philosophy, including medical ethics and ethical questions in genetics and genomics. Her book Towards a Code of Ethics for Artificial Intelligence was published in December.

Jason Furman is Professor of the Practice of Economic Policy at Harvard Kennedy School (HKS). He is also nonresident senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. This followed eight years as a top economic adviser to President Obama, including serving as the 28th Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers from August 2013 to January 2017, acting as both President Obama’s chief economist and a member of the cabinet. During this time Furman played a major role in most of the major economic policies of the Obama Administration. Previously Furman held a variety of posts in public policy and research. In public policy, Furman worked at both the Council of Economic Advisers and National Economic Council during the Clinton administration and also at the World Bank. In research, Furman was a Director of the Hamilton Project and Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution and also has served in visiting positions at various universities, including NYU’s Wagner Graduate School of Public Policy. Furman has conducted research in a wide range of areas, including fiscal policy, tax policy, health economics, Social Security, technology policy, and domestic and international macroeconomics. In addition to articles in scholarly journals and periodicals, Furman is the editor of two books on economic policy. Furman holds a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University.

Peter Stone is the David Bruton, Jr. Centennial Professor and Associate Chair of Computer Science, as well as Chair of the Robotics Portfolio Program, at the University of Texas at Austin. In 2013 he was awarded the University of Texas System Regents' Outstanding Teaching Award and in 2014 he was inducted into the UT Austin Academy of Distinguished Teachers, earning him the title of University Distinguished Teaching Professor. Professor Stone's research interests in Artificial Intelligence include machine learning (especially reinforcement learning), multiagent systems, robotics, and e-commerce. In 2007 he received the prestigious IJCAI Computers and Thought Award, given biannually to the top AI researcher under the age of 35, and in 2016 he was awarded the ACM/SIGAI Autonomous Agents Research Award. Professor Stone co-founded Cogitai, Inc., a startup company focused on continual learning, in 2015, and currently serves as President and COO. > He has recently lead the preparation of the 2016 AI100 report on the “One Hundred Year Study of Artificial Intelligence.”

Wendell Wallach is senior advisor to The Hastings Center. He is also a scholar, consultant, and author at Yale University's Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics, where he has chaired Technology and Ethics studies for the past eleven years. His latest book, a primer on emerging technologies, is entitled, A Dangerous Master: How to keep technology from slipping beyond our control. In addition, he co-authored (with Colin Allen) Moral Machines: Teaching Robots Right From Wrong. He received the World Technology Award for Ethics in 2014 and for Journalism and Media in 2015, as well as a Fulbright Research Chair at the University of Ottawa in 2015-2016. The World Economic Forum appointed Mr. Wallach co-chair of its Global Future Council on Technology, Values, and Policy for the 2016-2018 term.

 

 

Spring 2017 - Special Eventstop ⇑

Apr 8

Remote Programming Contest


Date:
Saturday, April 8, 2017
Time:
7 a.m. - noon
Location:
Stanley Thomas Hall, Room 302, Tulane University

Tulane is hosting its second spring undergraduate Remote Programming Contest. Everyone is invited to compete. There will be a novice division for students who have not yet completed CMPS 1600 at Tulane and an expert division for everyone else. (Transfer students and guests from other universities should can complete maximum 2 college-level CS courses to compete as a novice. Novices may opt to play in the expert division).

Teams consist of 3 undergraduate students (any major, any class year). Grad students only by special permission; CS grad students cannot participate in this competition.

The competition is organized by Bucknell University, who kindly invited New Orleans students to participate remotely. During the competition, the students will work at Tulane on their laptops and submit solutions to Bucknell for judgement. Small number of other great universities were invited, among them Southeast University in China (located in Nanjing, which is 14 hours ahead of New Orleans). This timezone span dictates the need to schedule the contest early on Sat. April 9th, starting at 7am and running till noon New Orleans time. We are planning to run continuous teleconference between all participating sites and award diplomas and prizes.

The expert division teams will solve programming problems (that focus on problem solving techniques, no large software or GUIs). The novice teams will solve a mixture of logic puzzles and programming problems. Teams can program in their choice of Python, Java, C, C++, Ruby, or Matlab on each problem. Teams can sign up by emailing Prof. Kurdia at akurdia@tulane.edu.

Apr 20

2017 Tulane Engineering Design Expo


Date:
Thursday, April 20, 2017
Time:
9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Location:
Qatar Ballroom in the Lavin-Bernick Center for University Life, 2nd Floor, Room 212, Tulane University

This event is free and open to the public. Light food and drink will be served.

Join us in celebration of our students as they demonstrate the results of their final design projects, featuring novel ideas and elegant solutions in Biomedical Engineering, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Engineering Physics, and Computer Science.

Design demonstrations will be followed by Best in Category Awards, and an optional Faculty/Industry breakout session immediately following the program.

Don’t miss this excellent opportunity to see the Tulane values of design thinking, technical innovation, interdisciplinary collaboration and community outreach in action.

Fall 2016 - Special Eventstop ⇑

Oct 9

Declarative Learning Based Programming Workshop/Hackathon


Date:
Sunday, October 9, 2016
Time:
9 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Location:
Gibson Hall, Room 414, Tulane University
Instructor: Parisa Kordjamshidi (pkordjam@tulane.edu)
Invited Instructor: Bhargav Mangipudi (mangipu2@illinois.edu)
Teaching Assistant: Cassie Wang (xwang17@tulane.edu)

The goal of this one day event is to help the students who have taken the “Introduction to Machine Learning” course to get hands-on coding experience and get familiar with a platform for writing machine learning applications. The platform that will be discussed is a new declarative learning based programming language called Saul. The students learn how to start from scratch reading their data into a learning based program and start doing experimentation with feature extraction, training and evaluation of their models. We will have one tutorial as a part of the morning session and one as a part of the afternoon session. The rest of the day students do programming and will be helped to design an end-to-end basic model for their selected problem. This event is open to students outside the class and the interested colleagues and the general public.

Notes: For CMPS 3240/6240 students:

To take the full advantage of this event, you will need to have the following items before the workshop:
1. A laptop and basic programming skills.
2. IntelliJ IDEA, Java 8 and sbt (simple build tool) installed on your machines.
3. Assuming that you have a project specification already, have your raw data and your data reader program available.

For other interested participants: You could listen to the tutorial sessions and, if interested in doing more, prepare items 1 and 2 above and try out a walk-through example with us. There will be sandwiches for lunch; therefore, we need to know how many people will participate. Please email xwang17@tulane.edu, if you plan to attend. All class members are strongly encouraged to participate.

Oct 19

Machine Learning with MATLAB


Date:
Wednesday, October 19, 2016
Time:
4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Location:
Gibson Hall, Room 414, Tulane University
Instructor: Tim Mathieu | Senior Account Manager | MathWorks, Inc.
Pre-register here: www.mathworks.com/matlabtulane»

OVERVIEW

Machine learning techniques are often used for data analysis and decision-making tasks such as forecasting, classification of risk, estimating probabilities of default, and data mining. However, implementing and comparing machine learning techniques to choose the best approach can be challenging. In this seminar, you will learn about several machine learning techniques available in MATLAB and how to quickly explore your data, evaluate machine learning algorithms, compare the results, and apply the best technique to your problem. Highlights include unsupervised and supervised learning techniques such as:

• K-means and other clustering tools
• Neural Networks
• Decision trees and ensemble learning
• Naïve Bayes Classification
• Linear, logistic and nonlinear regression

MATLAB Table

Spring 2016 - Special Eventstop ⇑

March 2

Movie Screening: CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap


Sponsored by Tulane's Department of Computer Science

Date: Wednesday, March 2, 2016
Time: 7 p.m. – 9 p.m.
Location: Anna Many Lounge, #205 Caroline Richardson Building, Tulane University


Watch Trailer»

Facebook Event»

Tulane is hosting .

April 9

Remote Programming Contest


Date:
Saturday, April 9, 2016
Time:
7 a.m. - noon
Location:
Stanley Thomas Hall, Room 302, Tulane University

Tulane is hosting the first spring undergraduate Remote Programming Contest. Everyone is invited to compete. There will be a novice division for students who have not yet completed CMPS 1600 at Tulane and an expert division for everyone else. (Transfer students and guests from other universities may have completed a maximum of 2 college-level CS courses to compete as a novice. Novices may opt to play in the expert division).

Teams consist of 3 undergraduate students (any major, any class year). Grad students only by special permission; CS grad students cannot participate in this competition.

The competition is organized by Bucknell University, who kindly invited New Orleans students to participate remotely. During the competition, the students will work at Tulane on their laptops and submit solutions to Bucknell for judgement. A small number of other great universities were invited, among them Southeast University in China (located in Nanjing, which is 14 hours ahead of New Orleans). This timezone span dictates the need to schedule the contest early on Sat. April 9th, starting at 7am and running till noon New Orleans time. We are planning to run continuous teleconference between all participating sites and award diplomas and prizes.

The expert division teams will solve programming problems (that focus on problem solving techniques, no large software or GUIs). The novice teams will solve a mixture of logic puzzles and programming problems. Teams can program in their choice of Python, Java, C, C++, Ruby, or Matlab on each problem.

Teams can sign up here until April 1st: http://goo.gl/forms/my5z1BcIlR»

If you have questions, please write to Prof. Kurdia at akurdia@tulane.edu .

April 11

Department of Computer Science Presentation re: Coordinate Major


Date:
Monday, April 11, 2016
Time:
3 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
Location:
Stanley Thomas Hall, Room 302, Tulane University

We are holding a presentation of the Department of Computer Science and its Coordinate Major in Computer Science program on Monday, April 11, from 3 - 4:15 p.m. in Stanley Thomas Hall 302. Please invite your students who might be interested to attend!

This event introduces professors of the department and their courses and potential areas for capstone projects. It's also a great opportunity to meet CS students from different class years. The first half will be a presentation by CS professors followed by Q&A. The second half will be a meet-and-greet with refreshments. Students in their sophomore year (or later) who completed their intro CS classes will also be able to declare the coordinate major at this event. Students at the end of their junior year should make a special effort to attend, as the information presented will be helpful in capstone project selection. If you have questions, please write to Prof. Anastasia Kurdia at akurdia@tulane.edu .
May 6

Computer Science Capstone Projects Presentation


Date:
Friday, May 6, 2016
Time:
9 a.m. - 10:20 a.m. Lightning Talks; 10:20 a.m. - 11:40 a.m. Poster Session
Location:
Stanley Thomas Hall, Room 302, Tulane University

The Department of Computer Science invites everyone to the Computer Science Capstone Projects Presentation, a free public celebration of the achievements of our graduating seniors, who will present the results of their year-long interdisciplinary capstone projects.

The event is scheduled for Friday, May 6, in Stanley Thomas Hall, room 302, Tulane University (Uptown campus) and consists of two parts:

• 9 am - 10:20 am: Lightning talks, where each graduating student will deliver a five-minute talk summarizing the problem they were working on and their solution.
• 10:20 am - 11:40 am: Poster session, where the speakers will be available to provide more details about their projects, demonstrate software applications and hardware devices they have built, and answer questions from the audience.

Refreshments will be available at the poster session.

You are welcome to attend either or both sessions, and invite anyone who might be interested. Happy Computing! If you have questions, please write to Prof. Anastasia Kurdia at akurdia@tulane.edu .

Spring 2015 - Special Eventstop ⇑

April 29

Meet Sabrina Farmer, Senior Site Reliability Manager- Apps, Google, Inc.


Sponsored by Tulane's Department of Computer Science

Date: Wednesday, April 29, 2015
Time: 10 a.m. – 11 a.m.
Location: Stanley Thomas 302, Tulane University


Sabrina Farmer

Google, Inc., Mountainview, CA

Current SRE Lead Manager for Google Apps including: Gmail, Docs, Calendar, Enterprise


Sabrina Farmer»
is a senior engineering manager for the Site Reliability team at Google, responsible for Google Apps, and directly manages the teams responsible for running Gmail, the world's largest internet email service. She has been in production engineering for more than 18 years, and is a long-time advocate and supporter for women in technology.

Ms. Farmer will visit our campus tomorrow, Wednesday, April 29th, from 10:00 - 11:00 a.m. Please join us at ST 302 for an informal get-together to meet her and learn more about her experiences at Google. Light refreshments will be served.

Fall 2014 - Special Eventstop ⇑

November 13

GE Capital Visit: How Your Computing Skills Can Help Advance Your Career


Sponsored by Tulane's Department of Computer Science

Date: Thursday, November 13, 2014
Time: 12 p.m. – 1 p.m.
Location: Anna Many Lounge in the Caroline Richardson Building

This event presents students with the opportunity to talk with representatives of a leading tech firm and learn about job and training opportunities with General Electric Capital, and about life of computing specialists there. Prof. Anastasia Kurdia of the Dept. of Computer Science, the organizer of the event, will also be happy to answer any questions students might have about working in computing-oriented industry.

Summer 2013 - Special Eventstop ⇑

June 23 - 29

Computer Science Conferences


Tulane University Uptown Campus – Sponsored in Part by Tulane University

Reception: Tuesday, June 25, 2013
Time: 6 PM – 7:30 PM
Location: Lavin-Bernick Center for University Life – Qatar Ballroom – Room 212
Invitation Only

Mathematical Foundations of Programming Semantics Twenty-Ninth Conference
For More Information »

Twenty-Eighth Annual ACM/IEEE Symposium on
Logic in Computer Science (LICS 2013)
For More Information »

2013 IEEE 26th Computer Security Foundations Symposium
For More Information »

303 Stanley Thomas Hall, New Orleans, LA 70118 504-865-5785 compsci@tulane.edu