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Events This Week


Past Year Events of the Week


Week of March 3 - February 27, 2017


Friday, March 3

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Thursday, March 2

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Thursday, March 2

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Wednesday, February 1

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Tuesday, February 28

Mardi Gras Break


All University Offices will be closed

Have a safe Holiday

 


Monday, February 27

Mardi Gras Break


All University Offices will be closed

Have a safe Holiday


Week of February 24 - February 20, 2017

Friday, February 24

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Thursday, February 23

Colloquium

Why is the ergodic theory of stochastic PDEs different?

Jonathan Mattingly - Duke (HOST: Nathan Glatt-Holtz and Scott McKinley)

Abstract:

Ergodicity is one of the fundamental questions for a stochastic dynamical  system,  ensuring the convergence of  long time averages of observable quantities to a statistical steady state independent of the initial condition.

I will explore why the ergodic theory of stochastic PDEs is different and how it underlines the basic difference between ODEs and PDEs. I will start at the beginning giving a crash course on the basic elements needed to prove an ergodic result.  We will come to understand why sometimes ergodicity can be easy for hard PDEs. Time permitting I will touch on hypoellipticity in infinite dimensions and singular PDEs.

Location: Dimwiddie 102

Time: 3:30


Thursday, February 23

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Wednesday, February 22

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Tuesday, February 21

Secret Meeting of the L5 Society

Kristi Vandusen and Padi Fuster - Tulane University

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Secret Meeting of the L5 Society

Location: Stanley Thomas 316

Time: 4:15


Monday, February 20

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Week of February 17 - February 13, 2017
Friday, February 17

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Thursday, February 16

Algebra and Combinatorics Seminar


Classification of spherical diagonal actions of reductive groups, Part II.

Mahir Bilen Can - Tulane University

Abstract:


In this talk we present our recent progress on the diagonal actions of a reductive groups on product varieties of the form X_1 x X_2, where X_1 is a symmetric space and X_2 is a partial flag variety.  In particular, we classify all such actions.

Location:  Gibson Hall 400A

Time: 12:45


Wednesday, February 15

Continuum approximation of invasion probabilities for stochastic population models

Rebecca Borchering - University of Florida

Abstract:


When an individual with a novel trait is introduced in a new environment, we would like to understand what drives the likelihood that its lineage will persist. In deterministic population models, whether the invasive population “succeeds” often depends on whether the parameters of the system fall in a super- or sub-critical regime.  In stochastic population models, the parameters must be super-critical for there to be a substantial of invasion, but even in the super-critical regime, chance alone allows for many invasive lineages to quickly go extinct.

In this talk, we compare popular continuum approximations for the invasion probability to its exact solution. In particular, methods known as "Diffusion (or Stochastic Differential Equation) Approximation" and "Exponential Approximation" are derived. We find analytical expressions for these approximations in the large population limit and then use numerical methods to evaluate the performance of the approximation methods for finite populations.  Interestingly we find that the diffusion approximation fails to obtain the correct large population limit, but can perform well for small populations that experience near critical dynamics.  The exponential approximation obtains the right large population limit in the supercritical regime, but fails to capture nonmontonic characteristics of the invasion probability for small to intermediate sized populations. 


Location: Gibson 126

Time: 3:00


Wednesday, February 14

GRAD STUDENT COLLOQUIUM

Lasso, Group Lasso, and SLOPE

Lin Li - Tulane University

Abstract:


From linear regression, I will introduce the penalty method such as ridge method and lasso method. However, in some cases, the variates have strong correlation with each other, then we can use the group lasso. After that, I will talk about SLOPE(sorted L-One Penalty Estimation), which is method similar to the lasso method and consider the false discovery rate as the criteria.

Location: Stanley Thomas 316

Time: 4:15



Tuesday, February 14

Tulane AWM/AMS Student Chapter present:


COFFEE AND DISCUSSION: “Finding opportunities for conferences, workshops, etc”

Speaker - Institution

Abstract:

"We will be discussing effective ways to find and apply for conferences, workshops, and summer programs, including opportunities that are offered in collaboration with AWM.  Topics include attending the joint meetings, MSRI's, Advance grant workshops, area specific conferences/workshops, how to stay informed of future opportunities, and how to apply for funding."


Location: Dinwiddie Hall 102

Time: 2:00


Monday, February 13

Special Mathematical Biology seminar

Diabetes: One Disease, Many Paths

Dr. Arthur Sherman - National Institutes of Health

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Location:  Stanley Thomas 316

Time:  3:00



Week of February 10 - February 6, 2017
Friday, February 10

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Thursday, February 9

Colloquium

Global Regularity v.s. Finite Time Blowup for Compressible Euler Equations

Prof. Ronghua Pan - Georgia Tech (host Kun Zhao)

Abstract:

As one of the oldest nonlinear PDE systems, the compressible Euler equations has been studied by many outstanding mathematicians. However, some basic questions, such as the global existence of classical solution v.s. finite time blowup, are still open even in one space dimension. In this lecture, we will report our recent progress in this direction, including a complete understanding on isentropic flows, and a refreshed understanding on general adiabatic flows. This lecture is based on joint works with H. Cai, G. Chen, S. Zhu, and Y. Zhu.

Location: Dinwiddie 102

Time: 3:30


Wednesday, February 9

Algebra and Combinatorics Seminar


Classification of spherical diagonal actions of reductive groups

Mahir Bilen Can - Tulane University

Abstract:

In this talk we present our recent progress on the diagonal actions of a reductive groups on product varieties of the form X_1 x X_2, where X_1 is a symmetric space and X_2 is a partial flag variety. In particular, we classify all such actions.

Location: Gibson Hall 400A

Time:12:45


Wednesday, February 8

Probability and Statistics

Scalings and saturation in infinite-dimensional control problems with applications to stochastic partial differential equations.

David Herzog - Institution

Abstract:


We discuss scaling methods which can be used to solve low mode control problems for nonlinear partial differential equations.  These methods lead naturally to a infinite-dimensional generalization of the notion of saturation, originally due to Jurdjevic and Kupka in the finite-dimensional setting of ODEs.  The methods will be highlighted by applying them to specific equations, including reaction-diffusion equations, the 2d/3d Euler/Navier-Stokes equations and the 2d Boussinesq equations.  Applications to support properties of the laws solving randomly-forced versions of each of these equations will be noted.

Location: Gibson Hall 126

Time: 3:00


Tuesday, February 7

Graduate Student Colloquium

Poincare Duality With Local Coecients

Fang Sun - Tulane University

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Location: Stanley Thomas 316

Time: 4:15


Monday, February 7


TULANE AWM/AMS STUDENT CHAPTERS

Introduction to Riemannian Geometry

DR. DAGANG YANG - Tulaner - Institution

Abstract:

This talk is a brief introduction to Riemannian geometry. Namely, I will explain what is a Riemannian manifold, why should one be interested in Riemannian geometry, the meaning of the sign of the sectional curvature, and some well-known open problems in Riemannian geometry.

Location: Dimwiddie Hall 102

Time: 2:00


Monday, February 6

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Week of February 3 - January 30, 2017

Friday, February 3

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Thursday, February 2

Colloquium

Limit Shapes for Rational Functions


Robin Pemantle
University of Pennsylvania  (host mahir can)

Abstract:

Exact enumeration in probability and combinatorics often leads to rational generating functions.  These, in turn, lead to limit shapes, often more exotic than the generic Gaussian shape arising from a Central Limit Theorem.  This motivates the study of the asymptotics of the coefficients of a rational power series

                F(Z) = P(Z) / Q(Z) = sum_R a_R Z^R

where Z = (z_1, ... , z_d) and R = (r_1, ..., r_d) are d-tuples. Estimating a_R from P and Q is both a theoretical problem and a problem in effective computation.  I will discuss what we know about how to read limit shape behavior from P and Q (mostly from Q). The examples in the pictures will all be explained.


02b-octic  06-qrw


aztec256  QRW-2D


Location:  Dinwiddie 102


Time:  3:30



Thursday, February 2

Algebra and Combinatorics Seminar

Introduction to the Hodge Conjecture (part 2)

Al Vitter - Tulane University

Abstract:

This will be a continuation of my first talk. I will state the Hodge Conjecture and then talk about some aspects that show its subtlety and importance. The Hodge Conjecture concerns smooth (non-singular) complex projective varieties. It relates the purely algebraic structure of the variety to its topological/complex-analytic structure via its cohomology groups. I will begin by discussing in a relatively untechnical way, some of the mathematics needed to state clearly the Hodge Conjecture.

Location: Gibson 400A

Time: 1:00



Wednesday, February 1

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Friday, February 31

Graduate Student Colloquium

Some algebraic properties of toric edge rings

Slivi Beyarslan - Tulane University

Abstract:

Student Colloquium

Location:  Stanley Thomas 316

Time: 4:15


Tuesday, January 31

AWM / AMS

Biofluids of reproduction: oscillators, viscoelastic networks and sticky situations.

Dr. Lisa Fauci - Tulane University

Abstract:

From fertilization to birth, successful mammalian reproduction relies on interactions of elastic structures with a fluid environment.  Sperm flagella must move through cervical mucus to the uterus and into the oviduct, where fertilization occurs.  In fact, some sperm may adhere to oviductal epithelia, and must change their pattern of oscillation to escape.  In addition, coordinated beating of oviductal cilia also drives the flow.  Sperm-egg penetration, transport of the fertilized ovum from the oviduct to its implantation in the uterus and, indeed, birth itself are rich examples of elasto-hydrodynamic coupling.   
We will discuss successes and challenges in the mathematical and computational modeling of the biofluids of reproduction.  In addition, we will present reduced models that evoke intriguing questions in fundamental fluid dynamics. 

Location: Dinwiddie 102

Time: 2:00



Monday, January 30

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Week of January 27 - January 23, 2017

Friday, January 27

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Thursday, January 26

Algebra and Combinatorics Seminar

Introduction to the Hodge Conjecture

Al Vitter - Tulane University

Abstract:

This will be the first of probably 2 talks. The Hodge Conjecture concerns smooth (non-singular) complex projective varieties. It relates the purely algebraic structure of the variety to its topological/complex-analytic structure via its cohomology groups. I will begin by discussing in a relatively untechnical way, some of the mathematics needed to state clearly the Hodge Conjecture. Then I will concentrate on some aspects that  bring out (hopefully) the subtlety and importance of the conjecture.

Location: Gibson Hall 400A

Time: 4:00



Wednesday, January 25

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Tuesday, January 24

Graduate Student Colloquium

The Method of Brackets

Victor H. Moll - Tulane University

Abstract:

 Capture22

Location:  Stanley Thomas 316

Time: 4:30


Monday, January 23

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Week of January 20 - January 16, 2017

Friday, January 20

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Thursday, January 20

Sixth Annual Winter Workshop on Neuromechanics and Dynamics of Locomotion


Location:  Lavin Bernick Center for University Life (building 29) - Kendall Cram Room

Thursday, January 19

Sixth Annual Winter Workshop on Neuromechanics and Dynamics of Locomotion


Location:  Lavin Bernick Center for University Life (building 29) - Kendall Cram Room

 


Thursday, January 19

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Wednesday, January 18

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Tuesday, January 17

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Monday, January 16
Martin Luther King Day


Mathematics Department, 424 Gibson Hall, New Orleans, LA 70118 504-865-5727 math@math.tulane.edu