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Events This Week




Week of August 29 - September 2, 2016
Monday, August 29

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Tuesday, August 30

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Wednesday, August 31

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Thursday, September 1

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Friday, September 2

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Week of September 5 - September 9, 2016
Monday, September 5
Labor Day University Holiday

Tuesday, September 6

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Wednesday, September 7

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Thursday, September 8

Numerical Methods for Hyperbolic Systems of PDEs with Uncertainties

Alina ChertockNorth - Carolina State University (Host: Alexander Kurganov)

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Many system of hyperbolic conservation and balance laws contain uncertainties in model parameters, initial or boundary data due to modeling or measurement errors. Quantifying these uncertainties is important for many applications since it helps to conduct sensitivity analysis and to provide guidance for improving the models. Among the most popular numerical methods for uncertainty quantification are stochastic spectral methods. Such methods decompose random quantities on suitable approximation bases. Their attractive feature is that they provide a complete probabilistic description of the uncertain solution.  

 A classical choice for the stochastic basis is the set of generalized Polynomial Chaos (gPC) spanned by random polynomials, continuous in the stochastic domain and truncated to some degree. It is well-known, however, that when applied to general nonlinear (non-symmetric) hyperbolic systems, such approximations result in systems for the gPC coefficients, which are not necessarily globally hyperbolic since their Jacobian matrices may contain complex eigenvalues. In this talk, I will present a splitting strategy that allows one to overcome this difficulty and demonstrate the performance of the proposed approach on a number of numerical examples including systems of shallow water and compressible Euler equations.

Location: Gibson Hall 414

Time: 3:30


Friday, September 9

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Week of September 12 - September 16, 2016
Monday, September 12

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Tuesday, September 13

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Wednesday, September 14

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Thursday, September 15

Ramanujan's Mock Theta Functions and Quantum Modular Forms

Holly Swisher - Oregon State University (Host: Victor Moll)

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Nearly 100 years after his untimely death, Ramanujan's legacy is still intriguing mathematicians today.  One of the last obsessions of Ramanujan were what he called mock theta functions.  In this talk, we will begin by discussing Ramanujan's work on integer partitions and how they connect to objects called modular forms and mock theta functions.  Then we will continue by exploring some recent work in this area, including the construction of a table of mock theta functions with some interesting properties, including what is called quantum modularity.   Part of this work is joint with Sharon Garthwaite, Amanda Folsom, Soon-Yi Kang, and Stephanie Treneer.  The rest is joint with Brian Diaz and Erin Ellefsen from their undergraduate REU project this summer.

Location: Gibson Hall 414

Time: 3:30


Friday, September 16

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Week of September 19 - September 23, 2016
Monday, September 19

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Tuesday, September 20

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Wednesday, September 21

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Thursday, September 22

Combinatorial Hopf Algebras and Antipode

Nantel Bergeron - York University (Host: Mahir Can)

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Given a family of combinatorial objects we often have operations that allow us to combine them to create larger objects and/or ways to decompose them into smaller members of the family. In the best situation we have in fact an algebraic structure, i.e. a graded Hopf algebra. I will give example of such structure using graphs, trees, set partitions, etc.

The antipode is a map from the Hopf algebra into itself that is defined recursively, with a lot of cancelation and is difficult to compute in general. I will motivate why we should care about the antipode and why we should aim to find a cancelation free formula.

An important example is the combinatorial Hopf algebra of graphs. In this case, a cancelation free formula of for its antipode is given by, Humpert and Martin. We will see that such formula gives a structural understanding of certain evaluations of the combinatorial invariants for graphs. In particular we recover very nicely a classical theorem of Stanley for the evaluation of the chromatic polynomial at -1.

I will discuss some generalization of this example.

Location: Gibson Hall 414

Time: 3:30


Friday, September 23

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Week of September 26 - September 30, 2016
Monday, September 26

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Tuesday, September 27

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Wednesday, September 28

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Thursday, September 29

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Friday, September 30

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Week of October 3 - October 7, 2016
Monday, October 3

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Tuesday, October 4

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Wednesday, October 5

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Thursday, October 6

How Mathematical Models can help Public Health Workers control Zika, Ebola, and other Infectious Diseases

Prof Gerardo Chowell - GEORGIA STATE UNIVERSITY (Host: James Hyman)

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Location: Gibson Hall 414

Time: 3:30


Friday, October 7

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Xiaoming Zheng - CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY (Host KUN ZHAO)

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Week of October 10 - October 14, 2016
Monday, October 10

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Tuesday, October 11

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Wednesday, October 12

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Thursday, October 13
Fall Break

Friday, October 14
Fall Break
Week of October 17 - October 21, 2016
Monday, October 17

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Tuesday, October 18

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Wednesday, October 19

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Thursday, Octoberr 20

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Prof. Sorin Mitran - UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL (Host: LISA FAUCI)

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Friday, October 21

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Week of October 24 - October 28, 2016
Monday, October 24

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Tuesday, October 25

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Wednesday, October 26

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Thursday, October 27

Limit Theorems for Composition of Functions

Michael Anshelevich - TEXAS A&M (Host: MAHIR CAN)

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Limit theorems for sums of independent random variables (or, equivalently, for convolutions of measures) are a cornerstone of classical probability theory. Distributions arising as limits in these theorems are called infinitely divisible.

We will discuss limit theorems for repeated composition of functions on the upper half-plane. Note that unlike addition or convolution, composition is a non-commutative operation. What are the limit theorems? Which functions arise as limits? We will see both parallels and differences from the usual setting. This is joint work with John D. Williams.

Location: Gibson Hall 414

Time: 3:30


Friday, October 28

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Week of October 31 - November 4, 2016
Monday, October 31

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Tuesday, November 1

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Wednesday, November 2

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Thursday, November 3

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Friday, November 4

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Week of November 7 - November 11, 2016
Monday, November 7

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Tuesday, November 8

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Wednesday, November 9

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Thursday, November 10

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Friday, November 11

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Week of November 14 - November 18, 2016
Monday, November 14

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Tuesday, November 15

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Wednesday, November 16

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Thursday, November 17

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Geordie Richards - UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY (Host:  NATHAN GLATT-HOLTZ)

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Friday, November 18

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Week of November 21 - November 25, 2016
Monday, November 21

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Tuesday, November 22

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Wednesday, November 23

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Thursday, November 24
Thanksgiving Holiday

Friday, November 25
Thanksgiving Holiday
Week of November 28 - December 2, 2016
Monday, November 28

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Tuesday, November 29

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Wednesday, November 30

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Thursday, December 1

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Friday, December 2

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Week of December 5 - December 9, 2016
Monday, December 5

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Tuesday, December 6

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Wednesday, December 7

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Thursday, December 8

Spectral and Nonlinear Stability of Viscous Detonation Waves

Gregory Lyng - UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING (HOST: VINCENT MARTINEZ)

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In this talk we give an overview of a body of results pertaining to the stability of detonation waves. These are particular, dramatic solutions to systems modeling mixtures of reacting gases. They are known to have delicate stability properties. On the mathematical side, the centerpiece of the program is the Evans function. This is a spectral determinant whose zeros agree in location and multiplicity with the eigenvalues of the linearized operator about the wave; it enters the analysis at both the nonlinear and linear/spectral levels. We discuss both theoretical aspects of the Evans function and also issues related to its practical computation.  On the physical side, much of the novelty of this body of work stems from the inclusion of oft-neglected diffusive effects (e.g., viscosity, heat conductivity, species diffusion) in the analysis. Indeed, this modeling choice sometimes leads to surprising results.

Location: Gibson Hall

Time:  414


Friday, December 9

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Mathematics Department, 424 Gibson Hall, New Orleans, LA 70118 504-865-5727 math@math.tulane.edu