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News: 2017-2018

Fall 2017


Fall 2017

Capital One Lends Support to Girls’ STEM Workshop at Tulane November 15, 2017

girls-stem-workshop

The School of Science and Engineering’s Center for K-12 STEM Education hosted its 10th Girls in STEM at Tulane (GiST) program on Nov. 11, providing fifth- through seventh-grade girls the opportunity to meet and work with women role models in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields.

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Tulane Receives $1.7 Million Grant from Department of Defense for Blood Vessel Research November 14, 2017

blood-vessel-research

Tulane University’s Stryder Meadows, a cell and molecular biology professor, received a $1.7 million grant from the Department of Defense to study how arteriovenous malformations (AVM), which are defects in arteries, veins and capillaries, form Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT), a genetic disorder that affects about 1 in 5,000 people.

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Study Looks at Link Between Ice Sheet and Climate Change November 10, 2017

ice-sheet-climate-change

A Tulane University geologist is among a team of scientists studying an ancient Canadian ice sheet to determine if its collapse could be a preview of future climate change.

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Global Tech Company Sparks Interest in Artificial Intelligence Jobs November 9, 2017

rohit-israni

Expert engineers from one of the world’s most influential technology companies encouraged Tulane students to pursue careers in data science and artificial intelligence Wednesday during the Intel Artificial Intelligence (AI) Workshop held on the uptown campus of Tulane University.

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Environmental Control November 7, 2017

environmental-control

Since 2011, the Food and Drug Administration has approved roughly 200 novel drugs, of which approximately 25 percent are produced by cells.

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Land-building Can Reduce Carbon Dioxide in Atmosphere, Study Shows
November 7, 2017

wax-lake-delta

Wax Lake Delta near the Atchafalaya River is the subject of a study published in ‘Nature Geoscience.’ Alex Kolker, a Tulane professor of earth and environmental sciences, contributed to the study, which shows that land restoration can reduce the load of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

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Biomedical Engineering Department Celebrates 40 Years November 1, 2017

40 Year Logo

At 40 years old, the Tulane University Department of Biomedical Engineering is one of the nation’s oldest. It is a global leader in providing distinctive and creative interdisciplinary solutions to biomedical engineering research and design problems.

This week, the department celebrates in style with a department conference, lab tours and a gala Thursday night at the Audubon Tea Room featuring former New Orleans Saints player Steve Gleason delivering the A.C. Suhren Jr. Biomedical Engineering Lecture. Tulane President Mike Fitts will also speak.

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Study Looks at Link between Traumatic Stress and Alcohol Abuse October 24, 2017

study-looks-at-link-between-traumatic-stress-and-alcohol-abuse

Sufferers of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are more likely to abuse alcohol, but Tulane University researcher Jeffrey Tasker is hoping a study of the brain can provide insight into the problem and catch it before it escalates.

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Working On A Miracle October 17, 2017

Daniel Rees, Bionnovation graduate student

Daniel Rees, a graduate student in the Bioinnovation IGERT program, loads samples into an aggregation rate generator (ARGEN) instrument in the Center for Polymer Reaction Monitoring and Characterization (PolyRMC). Rees is working under the supervision of physics professor Wayne F. Reed to quantitatively characterize the stability of therapeutic protein drugs. The stability of these “miracle drugs” is an important issue in the biotechnology sector and carefully monitored by the Food and Drug Administration.

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Tulane Lab Looks to Create 'Dream Reaction' October 10, 2017

Daniel Shantz In Lab

Tulane University’s Shantz Lab has received a two-year grant of $110,000 from the American Chemical Society’s (ACS) Petroleum Research Fund to find a solution to one of the chemical industry's most demanding transformations, the direct conversion of benzene to phenol.

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Message from the Dean Fall 2017

Michael Herman Interim Dean

Welcome back! As we begin another exciting semester at Tulane, we here at the School of Science and Engineering are looking forward to a great year. As interim dean, it gives me great pleasure to thank our outgoing dean, Professor Nicholas Altiero, for his extraordinary service to the School. In his seventeen years as dean (first in Engineering and then in SSE), Nick has been an exemplary leader, catalyzing growth in every area of operations, and setting standards for all of us—students, faculty, and staff—to follow. We wish him all the best on his much deserved and long overdue sabbatical.

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Gift for K-12 STEM Honors Altiero Fall 2017

Nick Altiero

In the 17 years he has served as dean of the schools of Engineering (2000-2005) and Science and Engineering (2006-2017), Nicholas J. Altiero has been recognized as an innovator and leader in engineering education. To honor Altiero's personal and academic commitment to supporting K-12 science, technology, engineering and mathematics education, Tulane alumni and friends have established the Nick and Amy Altiero Directorship for K-12 STEM Education, a role that operates at the intersection of community service and academic leadership.

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Chemical Engineering Professor Lawrence Pratt Honored by American Chemical Society September 26, 2017

Lawrence Pratt

Lawrence Pratt, a chemical engineering professor in the School of Science and Engineering at Tulane University, has won a prestigious American Chemical Society award.

Pratt was named winner of the 2018 Joel Henry Hildebrand Award in the Theoretical and Experimental Chemistry of Liquids sponsored by Exxon-Mobil.

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Tulane Research Aids in Reading Earth's Diary September 26, 2017

Kyle Straub

A Tulane University geologist has concluded a study on climate change, which will help develop climate models that simulate the effects of climate change and the Earth’s response to it.

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Tulane Receives Grant to Reduce Auto Emissions September 19, 2017

Shantz Lab Grant Emissions

Members of Tulane University’s Shantz Lab will work with industrial scientists to assist in the development of next-generation materials designed to reduce harmful automotive emissions. The three-year-old lab and its group of students have received a grant and equipment resources from SACHEM, Inc., a chemical science company.

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Tulane Student Hopes Research Will Lead to Protection from Volcanoes, Earthquakes September 12, 2017

Tulane student hopes research will lead to protection from volcanoes, earthquakes

East Africa may be a long way from the Crescent City, but it is top of mind for Tulane PhD student Sarah Oliva, who is studying data from volcanoes and earthquakes in that region. Her goal is a better understanding of how a 3,000-kilometer long deep valley — the East African rift system — formed. Ultimately, she hopes her research will enable her to work with scientists and help governments protect residents living near the rift.

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Flood Prevention Runs in the Family September 7, 2017

Flood Prevention

It was a chance encounter with a random book in Howard-Tilton Memorial Library that brought Dennis Lambert’s professional career and family history together.

Lambert was a long-timer on the Tulane campus: He enrolled and withdrew (and enrolled again) from the university over a 14-year period, eventually earning three engineering degrees by the year 2000.

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Depression Treatment May Be Improving, Tulane Study Says September 5, 2017

Benjamin Hall

In a new study published in the journal Cell Reports, researchers associated with the Tulane Brain Institute say they have moved a step closer to improving treatment for chronic depression. The study involves deleting a subunit of the NMDA receptor complex in a specific type of brain cell in an effort to understand exactly how drugs like ketamine provide antidepressant relief.

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