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Nine Premier Scientific Groups Release White Paper on the Critical Role of Nonhuman Primates (NHPs) in Scientific and Medical Research

Posted: 13 Sep 2016

The paper highlights the essential role NHPs play in finding treatments for serious and life-altering conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, Zika virus, HIV/AIDS and Parkinson’s disease.

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TNPRC investigations into Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection

Posted: 13 Sep 2016

A TNPRC-led study investigates the immunological mechanisms that control the pathologies of a macaque model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB), in individuals infected with both diseases. HIV and Mtb are the two most deadly infectious agents of humanity. One in three people are latently Mtb infected, but latent Mtb can transform into active TB. Co-infection with HIV, which can lead to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and Mtb speeds the progression of both infections, a process likely driven by a depletion of CD4+ T cells. To study the immunological regulation of latent TB infection by HIV, Deepak Kaushal and colleagues at the TNPRC, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, LSU School of Veterinary Medicine, and Washington University School of Medicine infected macaques with Mtb and simian immunodeficiency virus, mimicking Mtb and HIV co-infection in humans. In a majority of animals, Mtb replication rapidly reactivated and progressed to active tuberculosis, and pathologies associated with simian immunodeficiency virus increased. Despite the decrease in pulmonary CD4+ T cells in all co-infected macaques, a third of the animals maintained tuberculosis latency. For this cohort, an increase in protective immune responses, primarily mediated by increased CD8+ and profoundly enhanced B cell responses, was associated with limited Mtb replication. Hence, this investigation points to a greater role of these immune functions in the maintenance of latency. These findings, recently published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA, may provide insights into natural immunity to Mtb and could help guide the development of vaccines and immunotherapies for tuberculosis and AIDS. Based on our data, future TB vaccination strategies should incorporate the elicitation of CD8+ and B cell responses as objectives.

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Research could help search for birth defect vaccine

Posted: 20 Oct 2015

Researchers at Tulane National Primate Research Center (TNPRC) and Duke University have developed a new model that could bring science one step closer to developing a vaccine against congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV), one of the world's leading infectious causes of birth defects. 

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Experimental Aerosol TB Vaccine Protects Monkeys, NIH-Funded Researchers Find

Posted: 16 Oct 2015

Researchers funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, have developed an investigational aerosol tuberculosis (TB) vaccine that induced potent immune responses in a small number of rhesus macaques and protected them against pulmonary infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis(Mtb). The findings appear in Nature Communications.

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Tulane Researchers Working on New Tuberculosis Vaccine

Posted: 15 Oct 2015

Researchers at the Tulane National Primate Research Center (TNPRC) are leading efforts to find a new vaccine for tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest diseases. Tuberculosis, a contagious infection of the lungs, affected more than nine million people in 2013, killing more than one million.

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The Search for Persisters

Posted: 24 Sep 2015

It starts with a tick bite. This may be followed by the characteristic bullseye rash. And then the other symptoms of Lyme disease appear. Fever, fatigue, body aches, and headaches can all set in.

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Animal research crucial to creating AIDS treatments

Posted: 24 Jul 2015

Scientists in Philadelphia may be on the cusp of curing AIDS.

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Animal Testing and Its Gifts To Humans

Posted: 22 May 2015

Patients with aggressive brain tumors finally have reason for hope. Thanks to the work of scientists and physicians at Duke University, an experimental new treatment for glioblastoma multiforme, or GBM—an aggressive tumor that kills about 12,000 people in the U.S. each year—is saving the lives of patients who, just months ago, had little hope of survival.

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Bay Area Lyme Foundation's LymeAid® Brings Celebrities and Scientists Together To Help Accelerate Medical Breakthroughs for Lyme Disease

Posted: 22 May 2015

PORTOLA VALLEY, Calif., May 19, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- On Sunday, May 17, Bay Area Lyme Foundation, the leading national nonprofit funder of innovative Lyme disease research, hosted more than 400 celebrities, philanthropists and noteworthy scientists at the third annual LymeAid®. The benefit dinner and concert raised approximately $600,000, of which 100% will go directly to fund research for Lyme disease. More than 300,000 Americans are diagnosed with this potentially debilitating disease each year.

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The TNPRC is a division of Tulane University (985) 871-6201 tnprc@tulane.edu