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Colloquia

Spring 2019 Colloquia

Check back soon for more information on the computer science seminar series. Unless otherwise noted, the seminars meet on Mondays at 4pm in Stanley Thomas 302. If you would like to receive notices about upcoming seminars, you can subscribe to the announcement listserv.

Jan 14

Approximation Algorithms for Optimal Packing in Two and Three Dimensions

Helmut Alt Visiting Professor, Tulane University

Abstract: Space efficient packing of geometric objects in two or three dimensions is a very natural problem which has interested mathematicians for centuries. Unfortunately, the computational complexity of finding space optimal packings seems to be very high. Even simple variants are NP-hard so that efficient approximation algorithms are called for. In the lecture, it will be shown how to approximate optimal packing for convex polygons in two and convex polyhedra in three dimensions if rigid motions are allowed for moving the objects. If only translations are allowed, we still can approximate the optimal packing of convex polygons. In three dimensions however, this problem seems to be much harder and we could only find algorithms for very special kinds of objects. This is joint work with Nadja Scharf.

About the Speaker: Helmut Alt studied mathematics since 1968 at Universitaet des Saarlandes, Germany. He graduated with a PhD which focused on complexity theory in 1976. He was a research associate at Universitaet des Saarlandes and an assistant professor at Pennsylvania State University. Since 1986 he was a Professor of Computer Science at Freie Universitaet Berlin, Germany. The focus of his work is on algorithms and complexity, in particular computational geometry.
Jan 23

Using Interactive Learning Activities to Address Challenges of Peer Feedback Systems

Amy Cook Carnegie Mellon University


This event will be held on Wednesday, 1/23/2019, from 4:00 - 5:00 p.m. in Stanley Thomas, Room 302. Please note the special weekday for this event.

Abstract: Project-based learning helps prepare students for jobs by providing not only the technical experience of completing a project, but also the soft skills such as teamwork and communication that employers desire. Peer feedback, where students critique each other’s work, is an essential aspect of project-based learning. However, students often struggle to engage in peer feedback, to improve the quality of feedback they provide, and to reflect on the feedback they receive. My research explores how digital systems and interactive learning activities can improve the peer feedback process.


About the Speaker: Amy Cook is a PhD candidate in the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. Her research lies at the intersection of human-computer interaction and STEM education. Her work involves designing both digital systems and learning activities to facilitate effective classroom interaction.
Jan 28

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Christer Karlsson South Dakota School of Mines & Technology

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Feb 4

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Feb 11

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Feb 18

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Feb 25

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Mar 11

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Mar 18

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Mar 25

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Apr 1

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Apr 8

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Apr 15

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Apr 22

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Apr 29

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303 Stanley Thomas Hall, New Orleans, LA 70118 504-865-5785 compsci@tulane.edu